Tagged: Marcus Aurelius Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Doug Belshaw 2:30 pm on March 11, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Marcus Aurelius,   

    There is a doom inorexable and a law inviolable, or there is a providence that can be merciful, or else there is a chaos that is purposeless and ungoverned. If a resistless fate, why try to struggle against it? If a providence willing to show mercy, do your best to deserve its divine succour. If a chaos undirected, give thanks that amid such stormy seas you have within you a mind at the helm. If the waters overwhelm you, let them overwhelm flesh, breath, and all else, but they will never make a shipwreck of the mind.

    Marcus Aurelius

     
  • Doug Belshaw 12:30 pm on March 11, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Marcus Aurelius   

    Is your cucumber bitter? Throw it away. Are there briars in your path? Turn aside. That is enough. Do not go on to say, ‘Why were things of this sort ever brought into the world?’

    Marcus Aurelius

     
  • Doug Belshaw 8:30 am on February 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Empedocles, Marcus Aurelius,   

    You are composed of three parts: body, breath, and mind. The first two merely belong to you in the sense that you are responsible for their care; the last alone is truly yours. If, then, you put away from this real self – from your understanding, that is – everything that others do or say and everything you yourself did or said in the past, together with every anxiety about the future, and everything affecting the body or its partner breath that is outside your own control, as well as everything that swirls about you in the eddy of outward circumstance, so that the powers of your mind, kept thus aloof and unspotted from all that destiny can do, may live their own life in independence, doing what is just, consenting to what befalls, and speaking what is true – if, I say, you put away from this master-faculty of yours every such clinging attachment, and whatever lies in the years ahead or the years behind, teaching yourself to become what Empedocles calls a ‘totally rounded orb, in its own rotundity joying’, and to be concerned solely with the life which you are now living, the life of the present moment, then until death comes you will be able to pass the rest of your days in freedom from all anxiety, and in kindliness and good favour with the deity within you.

    Marcus Aurelius

     
  • Doug Belshaw 6:12 am on February 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Marcus Aurelius, ,   

    All the blessings which you pray to obtain hereafter could be yours today, if you did not deny them to yourself. You have only to have done with the past altogether, commit the future to providence, and simply seek to direct the present hour aright into the paths of holiness and justice: holiness, by a loving acceptance of your apportioned lot, since Nature produced it for you and you for it: justice, in your speech by a frank and straightforward truthfulness, and in your acts by a respect for law and for every man’s rights. Allow yourself, too, no hindrance from the malice, misconceptions or slanders of others, nor yet from any sensations this fleshly frame may feel; its afflicted part will look to itself. The hour for your departure draws near; if you will but forget all else and pay sole regard to the helmsman of your soul and the divine spark within you – if you will but exchange your fear of having to end your life some day for a fear of failing even to begin it on nature’s true principles – you can yet become a man, worthy of the universe that gave you birth, instead of a stranger in your own homeland, bewildered by each day’s happenings as though by wonders unlooked for, and ever hanging upon this one or the next.

    Marcus Aurelius

     
  • Doug Belshaw 10:30 pm on February 26, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , free will, Marcus Aurelius   

    “The robber of your free will,” writes Epictetus, “does not exist.”

    Marcus Aurelius

     
  • Doug Belshaw 8:30 am on February 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: agitation, Marcus Aurelius   

    Remember the country mouse’s encounter with the town mouse, and the flurry and agitation into which it threw him

    Marcus Aurelius

     
  • Doug Belshaw 6:27 am on February 25, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: consistency, Marcus Aurelius   

    If a man’s life has no consistent and uniform aim, it cannot itself remain consistent or uniform.

    Marcus Aurelius

     
  • Doug Belshaw 10:25 am on February 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Marcus Aurelius   

    To expect bad men never to do bad things is insensate; it is hoping for the impossible. To tolerate their offences against others, and expect none against yourself, is both irrational and arbitrary.

    Marcus Aurelius

     
  • Doug Belshaw 8:15 am on February 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Marcus Aurelius   

    Our anger and annoyance are more detrimental to us than the things themselves which anger or annoy us.

    Marcus Aurelius

     
  • Doug Belshaw 6:46 am on February 21, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Marcus Aurelius, patience   

    Tell yourself, when you feel exasperated and it of all patience, that this mortal life endures but a moment; it will not be long before we shall one and all have been laid to rest.

    Marcus Aurelius

     
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