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  • Doug Belshaw 9:28 am on June 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: philosophy, , translation   

    Without historical sensitivity, the interpreter will be at the mercy of his sources, or of his own prejudices, or both/ And without some philosophical impetus, he will not be able to create a lifelike account of what is protagonists were about, why they inquired and reasons as they did; at best. he will produce a hodge-podge of unrelated insights.

    Edward Hussey, ‘The Presocratics’ (p.154)
     
  • Doug Belshaw 9:21 am on June 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: philosophy,   

    The inner logic of the Atomist theory, therefore, led straight to the conclusion that consciousness and perception, as they are known in ordinary experiences, are epiphenomena, determined and accounted for completely by the states and rearrangements of components not themselves capable of consciousness or perception… It followed that the whole history of the universe was determined, if at all, by a ‘meaningless’ necessity inherent in the laws governing the collision and rebound of atoms, a force which was devoid of any inherent tendency to the better, or of any regard for the wishes and requirements of such accidental by-products as conscious beings.

    Edward Hussey, ‘The Presocratics’ (p.148)
     
  • Doug Belshaw 9:15 am on June 30, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: philosophy,   

    Anaxagoras said that the most happy man was someone who would seem a strange person to the common run of men, and that what made existence as a human being preferable to non-existence was the possibility of contemplating the universe.

    Edward Hussey, ‘The Presocratics’ (p.141)
     
  • Doug Belshaw 6:10 am on April 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: philosophy, ,   

    Our minds must relax: they will rise better and keener after a rest. Just as you must not force fertile farmland, as uninterrupted productivity will soon exhaust it, so constant effort will sap our mental vigour, while a short period of rest and relaxation will restore our powers. Unremitting effort leads to a kind of mental dullness and lethargy.

    – Seneca, On Tranquility of Mind

     
  • Doug Belshaw 6:47 am on April 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , philosophy,   

    ‘Recte facti, fecisse merces est;’ [The reward for acting properly is to have done so]

    Michel de Montaigne, ‘On glory’, The Complete Essays
     
  • Doug Belshaw 6:46 am on April 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , philosophy,   

    I a not so much worried about how I am in the minds of other men as how I am to myself. I want to be enriched by me not by borrowings from others. Those outside us only see events and external appearances: anyone can put on a good outward show while inside he is full of fever and fright. They do not see my mind: they only see the looks on my face.

    Michel de Montaigne, ‘On glory’, The Complete Essays
     
  • Doug Belshaw 6:44 am on April 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , philosophy,   

    Whoever acts worthily only when others can know of it (and think better of him when they do), whoever never wishes to act well in circumstances where his virtue cannot come to the knowledge of men, is not a man who will be of much use to you.

    Michel de Montaigne, ‘On glory’, The Complete Essays
     
  • Doug Belshaw 6:42 am on April 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , philosophy,   

    All the glory I claim for my life is to have lived a tranquil one — not tranquil according to the standards of Metrodorus or Arcesilas or Aristippus but my own. Since Philosophy has been able to discover no good method leading to tranquillity which is common to all men, let each man seek his own one as an individual.

    Michel de Montaigne, ‘On glory’, The Complete Essays
     
  • Doug Belshaw 6:41 am on April 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , philosophy,   

    Yet within ourselves we are somehow double creatures, with the result that what we believe we do not believe, what we condemn we cannot rid ourselves of.

    Michel de Montaigne, ‘On glory’, The Complete Essays
     
  • Doug Belshaw 6:39 am on April 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , philosophy,   

    That was also one of the principal doctrines of Epicurus: for that precept of his School, Conceal thy life (which enjoins men not to lumber themselves with business and affairs) also necessarily presupposes a contempt for glory, which is the world’s approbation of such of our actions as we make public.

    Michel de Montaigne, ‘On glory’, The Complete Essays
     
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