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dynamicskillset.com

 

'Manspreading' and 22 more words added to Oxford Dictionaries

Awesome.

manspreading, n.: the practice whereby a man, especially one travelling on public transport, adopts a sitting position with his legs wide apart, in such a way as to encroach on an adjacent seat or seats

 
 
 
 
 

Red Ocean Strategy vs Blue Ocean Strategy

Had to look this up after seeing it mentioned in a slidedeck today...

The terms red and blue oceans denote the market universe. Red oceans are all the industries in existence today – the known market space, where industry boundaries are defined and companies try to outperform their rivals to grab a greater share of the existing market. Cutthroat competition turns the ocean bloody red. Hence, the term ‘red’ oceans.

Blue oceans denote all the industries not in existence today – the unknown market space, unexplored and untainted by competition. Like the ‘blue’ ocean, it is vast, deep and powerful –in terms of opportunity and profitable growth.

The chart above summarizes the distinct characteristics of competing in red oceans (Red Ocean Strategy) versus creating a blue ocean (Blue Ocean Strategy).

 
 

The Caveman Guide to Parenting | Nautilus

Hmmm, not going to be jumping on this bandwagon...

It’s also likely that Paleolithic parents slept in the same room as their children, a common characteristic of most hunter-gatherer populations, Crittenden says. Western families traditionally avoid this practice, known as co-sleeping, but there is some evidence that it can lead to more well-adjusted children, says James McKenna, an anthropologist at the University of Notre Dame, who has observed benefits to these “ancestral patterns” in his sleep clinic. “The co-sleepers were more calm, more frequently able to solve problems by themselves, and more willing and able to meet new children,” he says.

 

Austin Kleon's weekly newsletter

One image, ten links.

 

iDoneThis newsletter

Another example of a very short newsletter with a single link. Nice approach.